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Davis Community Meals

Mission Statement

The purpose of Davis Community Meals is to provide low-income and homeless individuals and families with housing, food, and human services to help them rebuild their lives.


About Us

The Shelter has also experienced an increase in the number of staff that are available to work with clients. At the present time, there is a Shelter Administrator, Case Managers, Career Counselor, Drug Alcohol Counselor, Resource Center Coordinator, Volunteer Coordinator, Overnight Staff, and of course, there are the numerous volunteers without which the Shelter could not operate.

During 2005, DCM became partners in an affordable housing development in Davis, Cesar Chavez Plaza, with Neighborhood Partners and the Yolo County Housing Authority. Cesar Chavez Plaza offers 53 single bedroom apartments. 19 of the units are set aside for “special needs” population of homeless or at-risk of homeless individuals and families with mental illness, physical disabilities or chronic substance abuse issues. The 19 units offer rents at “extremely-low income” rates and are affordable to those with minimal or fixed incomes. Cesar Chavez opened for occupancy on November 28, 2007. DCM provides a full time staff person to provide supportive services to the 19 “special needs” residents and others who reside in the complex. Currently, we have applied for the right to build a similar program at the city of
Davis owned site on 5th Street. The application is entitled Creekside Courts and we are anticipating operating another affordable housing development similar to Cesar Chavez Plaza.

At the beginning of 2015, we began a new program of street outreach. The program has several objectives: provide a comprehensive overview of who is homeless on the streets of Davis, prioritize services to the most vulnerable of those on the streets, and offer and provide wrap around services to those willing to accept them. The program will provide outreach, engagement, referrals, mutual trust, and services to the homeless in Davis. DCM staff are working with the local police, Yolo County Continuum of Care, and county staff and programs to provide the services to the individuals in the program. We will be using the facility at 512 5th Street (formerly the Cold Weather Shelter) to provide time limited housing to the most needy and working with Yolo County Housing and others to find appropriate permanent housing to the individuals residing there. To date, we have helped over 60 individuals with services and been able to secure housing for 4 individuals.

Where We Work

What We Do

Poverty
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DAVIS COMMUNITY MEALS Davis Community Meals was founded as a non profit, non denominational volunteer organization to provide free meals for low income and homeless individuals and families in the Davis area. In its initial stage, these meals were served once each week, eventually to be increased to twice a week. The organizing process was initiated in August of 1990 by representatives of local religious and civic groups, as well as unaffiliated individuals. The weekly meals were initiated in February 1991 and in February 1993 a second weekly meal was added. Meals are now served on Tuesday evenings at 5:45 p.m. and Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. A third meal was added in June 2006 on Thursday evening from 5:45 to 6:30 pm. Realizing the need for greater services in Davis for the homeless and low-income population, a sub committee of the DCM board along with other interested individuals began exploring the needs and opportunities for such services. A post office box was donated by a local businessman for use by homeless people without an address. Several self service laundry facilities agreed to donate or reduce the cost of their services for homeless people who needed to wash their clothing. In November of 1992, the necessity for an overnight wintertime shelter became apparent. Despite considerable opposition from neighbors, Davis Community Meals began operating a cold weather shelter for homeless individuals and families in January of 1993. This shelter was located in a city owned house in a residential area. The second shelter ...See More season began in November of 1993 and continued through April of 1994 located in a different rented single family home, again in a residential area. In addition to the shelter, Davis Community Meals opened a resource center in November 1993 to complement the cold weather shelter, offering referral information. , housing assistance, employment training assistance, and public benefit counseling to homeless individuals, families, and those at risk of becoming homeless. The resource center was originally located in the Life Center, a building owned by the Newman Center of the Catholic Church. Desiring to put a stop to the traveling nature of the shelter and end neighborhood opposition at each new location, DCM sought for over a year to acquire a permanent site in which to house both the shelter and resource center. With the assistance of numerous community members, and with financial support from the city, DCM acquired a tri-¬plex at 1111 H Street, which had the capacity and amenities to suit the varied needs of the shelter and resource center programs. The new facility underwent extensive renovations, most of it performed by volunteers, in order to facilitate single adults. The move to a permanent site established a new and exciting era for Davis Community Meals. With a permanent building, DCM gained the opportunity to provide more stability and continuity to its clients, allowing for expansion and improvement of programs and services to homeless clients. The resource center was able to operate all year. By July of 1997, the programs of the DCM Shelter had evolved into the forms in which they exist today. Of the 16 beds at the shelter at 1111 H Street, 14 were made available for transitional housing for homeless single adults. A minimum of two beds, one men's bed and one women's bed, were reserved for temporary emergency shelter. In June 2001, we began offering a transitional housing program for families at several scattered sites throughout Davis. Currently, there are 5 sites, capable of providing housing for 3-5 individuals at each site. The Shelter has also experienced an increase in the number of staff that are available to work with clients. At the present time, there is a Shelter Administrator, Case Managers, Career Counselor, Drug Alcohol Counselor, Resource Center Coordinator, Volunteer Coordinator, Overnight Staff, and of course, there are the numerous volunteers without which the Shelter could not operate. During 2005, DCM became partners in an affordable housing development in Davis, Cesar Chavez Plaza, with Neighborhood Partners and the Yolo County Housing Authority. Cesar Chavez Plaza offers 53 single bedroom apartments. 19 of the units are set aside for “special needs” population of homeless or at-risk of homeless individuals and families with mental illness, physical disabilities or chronic substance abuse issues. The 19 units offer rents at “extremely-low income” rates and are affordable to those with minimal or fixed incomes. Cesar Chavez opened for occupancy on November 28, 2007. DCM provides a full time staff person to provide supportive services to the 19 “special needs” residents and others who reside in the complex. Currently, we have applied for the right to build a similar program at the city of Davis owned site on 5th Street. The application is entitled Creekside Courts and we are anticipating operating another affordable housing development similar to Cesar Chavez Plaza. At the beginning of 2015, we began a new program of street outreach. The program has several objectives: provide a comprehensive overview of who is homeless on the streets of Davis, prioritize services to the most vulnerable of those on the streets, and offer and provide wrap around services to those willing to accept them. The program will provide outreach, engagement, referrals, mutual trust, and services to the homeless in Davis. DCM staff are working with the local police, Yolo County Continuum of Care, and county staff and programs to provide the services to the individuals in the program. We will be using the facility at 512 5th Street (formerly the Cold Weather Shelter) to provide time limited housing to the most needy and working with Yolo County Housing and others to find appropriate permanent housing to the individuals residing there. To date, we have helped over 60 individuals with services and been able to secure housing for 4 individuals. SERVICES We serve a wide variety of individuals and families in our programs, generally between 1,600-1,800 persons per year in our programs. All are economically disadvantaged, many homeless (all are homeless in our housing programs) and many suffer from physical disabilities, mental illness, and substance abuse issues. Typically, they have been victimized, ostracized, victims of discrimination, and often, the target of physical assaults for being homeless. Some have criminal histories and are on parole or probation. Occasionally, we deal with individuals who, due to a mental illness or condition, are a danger to themselves or others. Most qualify for a wide variety of governmental aide and assistance, but due to budget cutbacks, are having their assistance cut back or eliminated. Local housing policies and the rental market are causing rapidly increasing rents forcing many low-income out on the streets and making finding housing impossible for persons on fixed or low incomes. The following is a brief description of the services we are currently providing. Meals Program We provide a free meal on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5:45 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and lunch on Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. to seniors, low-income and homeless individuals and families, and any other member of our community. The meals are prepared and served at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, 640 Hawthorne Lane in Davis. In 2014, we provided 7,037 meals to 497 unduplicated low-income and homeless men, women and children. Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing Programs Our Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing Program for Adult Men and Women is able to provide shelter to 16 individuals; 12 men and 4 women. Of the 16 bed spaces, 14 are reserved for individuals in our transitional housing program and 2 for emergency shelter. During the operation of our cold weather shelter, all beds at the facility are used for transitional housing. Emergency shelter is offered to homeless individuals for up to 7 consecutive nights. An individual may stay in our emergency shelter for no more than 3 weeks per year. Emergency shelter offers individuals the opportunity to be in a safe and stable environment that provides for the basic necessities of life. In 2014, we provided emergency shelter to 107 homeless men and women. The transitional housing program for adult men and women allows homeless individuals to reside in a safe and stable environment that meets their daily needs for food and shelter while allowing them the opportunity to receive supportive services and to rebuild their lives. Individuals are allowed to remain in the program for a maximum period of 18 months. Our staff works directly with individuals to formulate an appropriate case plan. Our staff and volunteers offer career counseling programs, substance abuse recovery programs, mental health counseling, life skills training, individual planning, and assistance obtaining permanent housing. After initiation of the case plan, staff and volunteers work with clients during their time in transitional housing to set long term goals, to seek and maintain employment, encourages them to save their earnings in preparation of finding permanent housing and assistance in securing permanent housing. Staff assists clients in finding furniture and appliances for the client’s permanent housing. During 2014, we provided transitional housing to 42 adult men and women. Of the 42, 23 became employed, 7 began receiving some form of public benefit, generally SSI, and 23 adult individuals left our program and moved into permanent housing. Family Transitional Housing Program The Family Transitional Housing Program serves homeless families with minor children and currently offers 5 units of housing: 2 2-bedroom apartment units and 3 1-bedroom apartment units. The maximum length of stay in the program is 18 months. The family transitional housing program allows homeless families a place to reside in a safe and stable environment that meets their daily needs for food and shelter while allowing them the opportunity to receive supportive services and to rebuild their lives. They are allowed to remain in the program for a maximum period of 18 months. Our staff works directly with them to formulate an appropriate case plan. Our staff and volunteers offer career counseling programs, substance abuse recovery programs, mental health counseling, life skills training, individual planning, and assistance obtaining permanent housing. After initiation of the case plan, staff and volunteers work with clients during their time in transitional housing to set long term goals, to seek and maintain employment, encourages them to save their earnings in preparation of finding permanent housing and assistance in securing permanent housing. Staff assists clients in finding furniture and appliances for the client’s permanent housing. Additional supportive services are offered in the area of life skills training, parenting classes, child development classes, and parent-child playgroups. We provided transitional housing to 12 homeless families during 2014 consisting of 14 adults and 16 minor children. Of the 12 families, 9 parents became employed and in 4 they began receiving some form of public benefit, i.e. Cal Works, SSI, etc. 7of the families completed the program in 2014 and moved into permanent housing and 5 of the families remained in the program at the end of 2014. Street Outreach Our street outreach program has been operating since January 2015. To date, we have provided services to over 60 individuals and found housing for 4 individuals. Resource Center/Day Shelter We offer a day shelter/resource center Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at 1111 H Street, Davis. The focus of our day shelter/resource center is to provide homeless and low-income individuals and family’s access to basic necessities of life, such as showers, personal hygiene products, clothing, laundry facilities, and other necessities. Additionally, we provide access to a telephone, transportation arrangements, mail address service, and a computer room. Clients are offered services similar to our transitional housing clients, such as career counseling programs, substance abuse recovery programs, mental health counseling, life skills training, individual planning, and assistance obtaining permanent housing. The staff and volunteers at the day shelter/resource center works cooperatively with many other agencies within Yolo County and the Sacramento region to offer services to homeless and low-income individuals and families. These include referrals, where appropriate, to Yolo County Mental Health, STEAC, many drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs, Wayfarers Center, Communicare Health Centers, SADVC, etc. We provided services to 1,003 low-income and homeless individuals and families during 2014: 610 adults and 393 children. Cesar Chavez Plaza Permanent Supportive Housing Our permanent supportive housing program at Cesar Chavez Plaza is the first in Yolo County targeting chronically homeless individuals and those at risk of homelessness who also suffer from mental and/or physical disabilities, including chronic substance abuse. The supportive housing program offers a 1 bedroom apartment to those adults whose incomes are extremely low and offers housing to those who receive fixed incomes such as SSI, veteran’s benefits, etc. The apartment complex has a total of 52 units, 19 of which are special needs units providing supportive services. DCM provides a full time staff person who provides supportive services to the 19 special needs units and to others in need in the apartment complex. The complex opened in November 2007 and is fully occupied. To date, the complex accommodates 17 formerly homeless individuals and 34 individuals with special needs. Show Less

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