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Cabo Verde

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Causes We Support

Environment
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Health
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Environment
The Cabo Verdean climate is warm and dry. Deforestation and desertification are major environmental concerns in Cabo Verde due to the arid climate and the exploitation of already scarce natural resources.1 The nation is party to a number of international environmental agreements including ones on biodiversity, climate change, desertification, endangered species, environmental modification, hazardous wastes, law of the sea and marine dumping.2

Show References
1 https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/cv.html
2 Ibid
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Cabo Verde News

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Geography

Western Africa, group of islands in the North Atlantic Ocean, west of Senegal
Area

Total 4,033 sq km
Land 4,033 sq km
Water 0 sq km

Climate

temperate; warm, dry summer; precipitation meager and erratic
Natural Resources

salt, basalt rock, limestone, kaolin, fish, clay, gypsum ;
Natural Hazards

prolonged droughts; seasonal harmattan wind produces obscuring dust; volcanically and seismically active

volcanism: Fogo (elev. 2,829 m), which last erupted in 1995, is Cape Verde's only active volcano Fogo (elev. 2,829 m), which last erupted in 1995, is Cape Verde's only active volcano
Current Environmental Issues

soil erosion; deforestation due to demand for wood used as fuel; water shortages; desertification; environmental damage has threatened several species of birds and reptiles; illegal beach sand extraction; overfishing

Demographics

Nationality
Cape Verdean
Population
531,046 (July 2013 est.)
Ethnic Groups
Languages
Religions

Finances

The economy is service-oriented with commerce, transport, tourism, and public services accounting for about three-fourths of GDP. This island economy suffers from a poor natural resource base, including serious water shortages exacerbated by cycles of long-term drought and poor soil for agriculture on several of the islands. Although about 40% of the population lives in rural areas, the share of food production in GDP is low. About 82% of food must be imported. The fishing potential, mostly lobster and tuna, is not fully exploited. Cape Verde annually runs a high trade deficit financed by foreign aid and remittances from its ...See More large pool of emigrants; remittances supplement GDP by more than 20%. Despite the lack of resources, sound economic management has produced steadily improving incomes. Continued economic reforms are aimed at developing the private sector and attracting foreign investment to diversify the economy and mitigate high unemployment. Future prospects depend heavily on the maintenance of aid flows, the encouragement of tourism, remittances, and the momentum of the government's development program. Cape Verde became a member of the WTO in July 2008. Show Less ;
GDP Purchasing Power Parity

$2.214 billion (2012 est.); $2.123 billion (2011 est.); $2.02 billion (2010 est.)
Gross National Saving

23.4% of GDP (2012 est.); 21.4% of GDP (2011 est.); 25% of GDP (2010 est.)
Agriculture Products

bananas, corn, beans, sweet potatoes, sugarcane, coffee, peanuts; fish
Industries

food and beverages, fish processing, shoes and garments, salt mining, ship repair